Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Whoever Fights Monsters: My Twenty Years Tracking Serial Killers for the FBI by Robert K. Ressler and Tom Shachtman



Whoever Fights Monsters: My Twenty Years Tracking Serial Killers for the FBI by Robert K. Ressler and Tom Shachtman is the third book I finished listening to during the month of July. I listened to the unabridged audio version of this book, which was narrated by Tom Perkins.

Listening time for Whoever Fights Monsters: My Twenty Years Tracking Serial Killers for the FBI by Robert K. Ressler and Tom Shachtman is 11 hours, 25 minutes.

As I mentioned in another review I posted earlier this month, I've been on a nonfiction kick so far during the month of July. I like true crime books and the topics of serial killers and psychological profiling for the FBI make for interesting reading.

I really enjoyed listening to Whoever Fights Monsters: My Twenty Years Tracking Serial Killers for the FBI by Robert K. Ressler and Tom Shachtman. It's a well written book. I enjoyed how the the information is presented to readers as I found myself extremely riveted by this book from start to finish. There isn't a dull moment in this book to be found. 

The author, Robert K. Ressler, is actually credited with coining the term 'serial killer'. Ressler joined the FBI's Behaviorial Science Unit back in the 1970s and was instrumental in providing psychological profiles for violent criminal offenders. Additionally, Ressler was also instrumental in helping to set up Vi-CAP (Violent Criminal Apprehension Program) to name only a very few of his career achievements.

I enjoyed learning about the serial killers discussed in this book, the crimes they committed, and how they were apprehended by law enforcement. 

It was also enlightening to learn what actually makes a serial killer a serial killer. It was also fascinating to learn why white men within a certain age bracket are found primarily to be serial killers verses any other demographic. Also, the distinction between an organized verses disorganized criminal is discussed in length and how this distinction helps law enforcement complete an accurate psychological profile to aid in the capture of a violent criminal.

The following is the publisher's summary for Whoever Fights Monsters: My Twenty Years Tracking Serial Killers for the FBI by Robert K. Ressler and Tom Shachtman from Audible:
Face-to-face with some of America's most terrifying killers, FBI veteran and ex-Army CID colonel Robert Ressler learned from them how to identify the unknown monsters who walk among us - and put them behind bars. Now the man who coined the phrase "serial killer" and advised Thomas Harris on The Silence of the Lambs shows how he has tracked down some of the nation's most brutal murderers.
Just as it happened in The Silence of the Lambs, Ressler uses the evidence at a crime scene to put together a psychological profile of the killers. From the victims they choose, to the way they kill, to the often grotesque souvenirs they take with them, Ressler unlocks the identities of these vicious killers for the police to capture.
Join Ressler as he takes you on the hunt for America's most dangerous psychopaths. It is a terrifying journey you will not forget.
I am giving Whoever Fights Monsters: My Twenty Years Tracking Serial Killers for the FBI by Robert K. Ressler and Tom Shachtman a rating of 5 stars out of 5 stars.

Until my next post, happy reading!!

2 comments:

  1. Great review, Lisa! It sounds like there was a lot to learn from this one and you were truly a captivated reader!

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    1. Thank you, Judy!! So far, I'm having a great month of reading.

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