Wednesday, August 24, 2016

The Burnt Tattoo Murders: an Inspector Megs Caroleton Case by Linda C. Smith

Paperback Edition
I enjoy reading mystery novels so was thrilled to receive a FREE paperback copy of The Burnt Tattoo Murders: an Inspector Megs Caroleton Case by Linda C. Smith from the Goodreads Giveaway program. The Burnt Tattoo Murders: an Inspector Megs Caroleton Case by Linda C. Smith is approximately 172 pages in length.

Below is my honest and unbiased review of The Burnt Tattoo Murders: an Inspector Megs Caroleton Case by Linda C. Smith.

First off there is some minor editing work that needs to be done throughout The Burnt Tattoo Murders: an Inspector Megs Caroleton Case by Linda C. Smith. Nothing too major or distracting that would prevent one's reading enjoyment of this novel.

I enjoyed the storyline and characters overall and felt that the author's writing style kept my interest peaked enough throughout the entire novel. At times, the storyline/plot seemed too tidy/perfect, but this was a minor detail.

Other minor things that caught my attention in The Burnt Tattoo Murders: an Inspector Megs Caroleton Case by Linda C. Smith, was the fact that teaching assistants were referenced at the community college in the storyline... I've never heard of a community colleges having teaching assistants to help assist faculty members... Sure four year universities have graduate students acting as teaching assistants, so it was odd to me that a community college would have teaching assistants... This plot detail just didn't sit right with me while reading The Burnt Tattoo Murders: an Inspector Megs Caroleton Case by Linda C. Smith. I also didn't like the use of the word "knuckleheads" in reference to criminals by one of the main characters, Mike James. The word "knuckleheads" seems so benign a word to use when referring to criminals... We aren't referring to errant children here.

The following is the plot summary for The Burnt Tattoo Murders: an Inspector Megs Caroleton Case by Linda C. Smith from Goodreads:
I never give perpetrators nicknames. People who commit murder are murderers, not celebrities. But that’s my point-of-view.”

Megs Caroleton is a consulting inspector and very good at her job. She brooks no nonsense with those who break the law. She sees her job as taking lawbreakers off the street. She was once asked about profiling and she replied: “That’s not my job. Personally I don’t spend a lot of time profiling. I actually don’t care if they had a rough home life. To me the ‘nature or nurture’ debate belongs to philosophers.”

But in THE BURNT TATTOO MURDERS Inspector Caroleton just may need to rethink her position on profiling. She joins Mike James, a chief inspector with the San Francisco Police Department’s Major Crimes division on a case involving five victims, dismemberment, ancient tattoo rituals and the overall specter of the wolf. For this perpetrator is one who will test her basic assumptions about the nature of crime.
I probably won't go out of my way to read another novel by Linda C. Smith. However, I am giving The Burnt Tattoo Murders: an Inspector Megs Caroleton Case by Linda C. Smith a rating of 3 starts out of 5 stars.

Until my next post, happy reading!

2 comments:

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    1. Thanks for stopping by and leaving me a comment on my review of The Burnt Tattoo Murders: an Inspector Megs Caroleton Case by Linda C. Smith.

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